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Simplified Law: False Reporting Charges in Denver

Posted by Nikea Bland | Jan 23, 2015 | 0 Comments

If you or a loved one is facing False Reporting charges in Denver, Arapahoe, and Jefferson County, it can be difficult to understand just what to expect. It can be hard to get information about the crime you've been charged with, and contacting the police is never a wise idea (read a previous post about the importance of remaining silent). In today's simplified law blog, we're going to discuss False Reporting charges and give you a simple definition of the crime.

The Lawyer's Definition of False Reporting

The legal jargon:

“Aperson commits false reporting to authorities if:

(a) He or she knowingly:

(I) Causes by any means, including but not limited to activation, a false alarm of fire or other emergency or a false emergency exit alarm to sound or to be transmitted to or within an official or volunteer fire department, ambulance service, law enforcement agency, or any other government agency which deals with emergencies involving danger to life or property; or

(II) Prevents by any means, including but not limited to deactivation, a legitimate fire alarm, emergency exit alarm, or other emergency alarm from sounding or from being transmitted to or within an official or volunteer fire department, ambulance service, law enforcement agency, or any other government agency that deals with emergencies involving danger to life or property; or

(b) He makes a report or knowingly causes the transmission of a report to law enforcement authorities of a crime or other incident within their official concern when he knows that it did not occur; or

(c) He makes a report or knowingly causes the transmission of a report to law enforcement authorities pretending to furnish information relating to an offense or other incident within their official concern when he or she knows that he or she has no such information or knows that the information is false; or

(d) He or she knowingly provides false identifying information to law enforcement authorities.”

Facing False Reporting charges?

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The Simple Definition of False Reporting

The simplified version:

“Aperson commits false reporting if they knowingly:
  1. Activate a false fire alarm, or report a false emergency to the police, fire department, or other emergency service or law enforcement agency; or
  2. Prevent the report of a legitimate fire alarm, or prevent someone from contacting the police or other emergency services; or
  3. Make a false report to the police about a crime which did not occur, or provide false information about a crime that did occur; or
  4. Provides false identifying information (name, social security number, etc.) to the police.

Examples of False Reporting Charges

Image Credit: Pixabay - OpenClipartVectors

Image Credit: Pixabay – OpenClipartVectors

Covering for a Friend

Hilary and her friend Alice are out drinking one night. Alice isn't 21, so she has a fake id she used to get into clubs. After a night of partying, they hop into Alice's car and head home, making a stop at a Wal-Mart for some snacks. In the parking lot of the store, Alice fails to see a light pole, and crashes into it. Before the police arrive, Alice and Hilary decide that Hilary will say she was driving, since Alice was drinking underage. The police question the girls, and quickly discover their ruse. Now, Hilary is facing False Reporting charges, and Alice is being charged with Minor in Possession of Alcohol and Driving Under the Influence of Alcohol (DUI) in Denver County.

Image Credit: Pixabay - OpenClipartVectors

Image Credit: Pixabay – OpenClipartVectors

No Crime Committed

Natasha has been going out with Kevin for a couple of years. She knew Kevin had a criminal record, having spent a year in jail for Theft charges. One day, Natasha finds suspicious texts on Kevin's phone, and she's convinced he's cheating on her. She saw in the paper that a Theft just occurred at a nearby convenience store, so she hatches a plan: She calls the police anonymously, and tells them she believes it is the man who works across the street who has a criminal record. The police investigate, and realize that Kevin had nothing to do with the crime. They pull the phone records and discover that Natasha made the fake call – now she is facing False Reporting charges.

Even a misdemeanor conviction will have a negative impact on your future. Contact a lawyer to ensure you get the best outcome in court.

Why You Need a Lawyer for False Reporting Charges

If you or a loved one is facing False Reporting charges in Adams, Douglas, or El Paso County, don't hesitate to contact one of our hard-hitting criminal defense attorneys. When it comes to crimes involving the police, DAs and judges are especially harsh. False Reporting to Authorities is either a class 2 or 3 misdemeanor, depending on the circumstances of the offense. But, even a misdemeanor conviction won't look good on your record. And, if you plead guilty to avoid jail time, you won't ever be able to seal your record. Don't put your future in jeopardy – hire an affordable lawyer who will guide you through the criminal justice system, getting the best possible outcome in your case.

Get Help Now

If you or a loved one is facing False Reporting charges, be smart, exercise your right to remain silent, and contact an experienced criminal defense attorney at the O'Malley Law Office for a free consultation at 303-830-0880. Together, we can protect your future.Request a Free Consultation

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Get Help Now

If you or a loved one is facing criminal charges in the Denver area, be smart, exercise your right to remain silent, and contact the best criminal defense lawyers at O’Malley and Sawyer, LLC at 303-830-0880. Together, we can protect your future. Request a Free Consultation

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